Saturday, October 24, 2009

THE SEEKER - 19/365



"I don't need an eye - I can see just fine with one, thank you very much. And I don't need you to loan me one of yours either because that won't do me any good.

A person has to see out of their own eye or eyes - whatever the case may be. I happen to think that one is much better than two. Unlike you, I'm not overloaded with too much information, I don't feel overwhelmed and I don't get conflicting messages.

One eye...One perspective."

My Reflection:

Sometimes, there are so many different ways to see a situation it can make me dizzy. This point of view, that point of view, I see it this way, I see it that way, I see it working, I see it not working...whew. Occasionally, I'd like to see things one way and one way only - clear, concise...no other options.

But while I might feel less confused, I'd also feel less inspired. Life is full of possibilities that can only be uncovered when my mind is open, fully engaged and ready to see them. I'd hate to think what would happen if I refused to change my mind after taking a better look at something.

Maybe the key is to take a longer look before getting my mind involved. The mind is always ready to have an opinion and perhaps if I can just stay open long enough - look and listen instead of trying to come up with the "right" answer - I might discover more than I was looking for in the first place.

Question:
How do you see?

2 comments:

Phil said...

The only problem I have with your "one eye concept" is that the use of only one eye will not give you DEPTH perception, which is essential to effective communication.
The problem that I have with people relying so much on cell phone and texting is that is one dimensional and totally eliminates the face-to-face element of communication. I think that e-mail/texting has produced significant and avoidable conflict and misunderstanding. Use two eyes!

Sue Ellen said...

I agree. Using a cell phone or "texting" is one dimensional (one-eyed) and doesn't give us the "depth" needed to see the situation accurately.